Anti-Untouchability Week

Untouchability is a practice in India since ancient times, which is against the society. To eradicate this social evil completely from our society, we observe the Anti-Untouchability Week every year from the 2nd of October to the 8th of October. It is a weekly event to be organized in every part of the nation to make untouchability leave our society as soon as possible. It is a day to fight untouchability and other such social evils.

Anti-Untouchability Week 2020

The anti-untouchability week is an event celebrated every year in India. This year, the observation will start on Friday (2 October) and will continue till Thursday (8 October). This year too, a lot of preparations are being made for this occasion. Now it is to be seen what different happens in this year's celebration than that of the other years.

History

Almost every part of India was affected by untouchability long ago. It has always been anti-social, for whose elimination it was necessary to enact a law. On 26 May 2011, a law was passed in protest against the Indian for its complete abolition. Through this law, it was ensured that there is no high and no low standard of people in India. Let everyone have the same opportunity. But it was necessary to spread awareness about untouchability among the people, for which provision was made for the annual event of Anti-Untouchability Week.

The observation of Anti-Untouchability Week was initiated by Dalit Civil Society. It is celebrated every year starting from October 2 to October 8, because the 2nd of October is the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti in India. Mahatma Gandhi devoted his entire life to the upliftment of human society.

Untouchability is one of the main issues that Gandhi Ji had put in place. He also carried out several campaigns to eradicate untouchability. This is the reason why we celebrate Anti-Untouchability Week starting from Gandhi Jayanti for 1 week so that for the whole week we can work on this issue from different perspectives.

Activities

On Anti-Untouchability Week, work is done to spread awareness to people about untouchability in the country. For this, news-paper, Internet, television, radio and various types of technologies are adopted. Seminars and campaigns are organized everywhere, through which people are given information about how untouchability is hollowing out the society, and we should always stand against it.

In view of the spread of untouchability in the society, large scale programs related to this are organized. All these programs attempt to eradicate the problem of untouchability. Dalit rights activists along with members of Dalit civil society also organize a multi-day national campaign to remove caste-based inequality and untouchability.

Through this campaign, they try to pressurize the government by enforcing the decisions taken, as well as attracting the attention of political parties and law enforcement units. People from different provinces and religions take part in all the programs organized on this day. Anyway, the purpose of these programs is not to awaken the people of one religion or caste but to the whole of Indian society.

Objectives and Significance

Anti-Untouchability Week is observed every year to raise awareness among people against the evils of untouchability in society. It is also aimed at attracting the attention of the government towards such an injustice spread in society. The observation of Anti-Untouchability Week is held for a week so that there can be worked on the issue from a different perspective. By the involvement of people, despite the differences, it is ensured that everyone is free to put its opinion on the concerning matter.

Untouchability creates a difference in society that is not justified. Making everyone aware of its side effects is the most important objective and the sole goal of celebrating this event. During this one week, such an environment is created so that everyone can consider together to eradicate social evil like untouchability and implement it. Only by doing this, all sections of the society can be given equal rights and at the same time, their views can be given equal importance in every social and national issue.

Untouchability in India after 73 Years of Independence

Untouchability is a disease born in India in ancient times that never gave the lower and exploited section of the society a chance to show its worth. Under this, one section of the society had all the powers while the other class was deprived of basic amenities. It was necessary to remove this disparity in society.

It was very important to throw untouchability out of the society, for which some of the greatest politicians of India like Vinoba Bhave, B. R. Ambedkar, and Mahatma Gandhi came forward. These people opted to fight such inappropriate behavior with the help of their supporters. It was one of the many evils of the society against which the leaders of independent India were fighting. Other such social evils were Sati Pratha, polygamy, child marriage, and others. While, some of these are still practiced in our society, others have been brought to an end with much effort.

Since the independence of India, the government has launched several campaigns for backward classes such as free education, reservation in colleges and government jobs, etc. This is an expectation for all liberals and Dalits and a promise of a new, better tolerant India.

Despite many constitutional amendments, untouchability and discrimination based on caste still persist in India. The politicians often use this to increase their vote bank and gain power in government. Dalits living in cities are less sensitive to this practice of discrimination in today's era, as they live in relatively remote and developed areas. Generally, people living in villages and other rural areas cling to their traditional beliefs and refuse to accept the changes and reforms introduced in society.

Untouchability in the Constitution of India

Even the Constitution of India declares untouchability injustice and illegal to practice. According to Article 17 of the Indian Constitution, the practice of untouchability in any form is punishable. The law was brought in the constitution on the 1st June of 1955 to protect the rights of underprivileged society. It is widely known as the law to protect civil rights and is called the ‘Civil Rights Protection Act 1955’. It is applicable to every individual of India belonging to any state or the Union Territory.

With the amendment of the constitution for the abolition of untouchability, the government incorporated the concept of reservation which means that some percentage places in government colleges and jobs were reserved for people like scheduled castes, scheduled tribes, and other backward classes.

Conclusion

Despite many constitutional amendments, untouchability and discrimination based on caste still persist in India. The politicians often use this to increase their vote bank and gain power in government. Dalits living in cities are less sensitive to this practice of discrimination in today's era, as they live in relatively remote and developed areas. Generally, people living in villages and other rural areas cling to their traditional beliefs and refuse to accept the changes and reforms introduced in society. The government has made several legal provisions to eradicate diseases like untouchability. We need to apply them to our life.